Scientific Program

Joint Symposia

Program Details
As of July 21, 2017

J01 Monitoring of the cryosphere

Convener: (National Institute of Polar Research, Japan)
Co-convener: J. Paul Winberry (Central Washington University, USA), Erik R. Ivins (Jet Propulsion Lab, Caltech, USA), Mirko Scheinert (Technische Universit├Ąt Dresden, Germany)

Description

Several kinds of environmental signals associated with ocean - cryosphere - solid earth systems have recently been detected in both polar regions. Ice-related motions that generate small magnitude events are generally named ice-quakes (ice-shocks) and can be generated by many glacial processes that include calving and basal slip. Cryoseismic waves are likely to be influenced by variations in environmental conditions, and the continuous study of their time-space variability provides indirect evidence of climate change. Glacial earthquakes are the most prominent phenomena found recently in polar regions, in particular at the Greenland ice sheet, new innovative studies from seismology and geodesy are expected by long-term monitoring under extreme conditions in the Earth's environment.

The response and influence on the cryosphere by the solid earth gives rise to a new understanding of earth surface interactions at a crucial time in earth history when global change is driving variations in mass balance of the polar ice sheets. This approach promotes integration of new earth science data into modeling of ice mass balance, ice dynamics, and solid earth responses to mass change. The glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA), the response of the solid earth to the changing mass of overlying ice, produces displacements of the crust measureable by modern geodetic techniques. Much effort has been focused on improving the ice history and earth rheological components in GIA models, as well as obtaining new geodetic measurements to test these models.

Taking these issues into account, the conveners are willing to invite many contributions to a special session on "Monitoring of the cryosphere", which will cover the recent achievements on glacial related seismic events, geodetic studies of the cryosphere dynamics and associated phenomenon observed in polar regions. It is especially encouraged to have contributions treating the observation and modeling of seismic signals involving dynamics of ice sheets, sea-ice, icebergs and glaciers. Although the glacial earthquakes are the most prominent evidence found recently in polar regions, all related topics involving polar geodesy and seismology are welcome, such as the dynamic feature of crust and mantle in the area, comparison of tectonic events and glacier-related seismicity, recent triggered earthquakes and active volcanoes, space satellite and ground based geodesy, GIA, harmonic tremor associated with cryoseismic events, etc.

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J02 Recent large and destructive earthquakes

Convener: (University of California Santa Cruz, USA)
Co-convener: Manabu Hashimoto (Kyoto University, Japan)

Description

Large, damaging earthquakes continue to strike globally, producing loss of life and destruction in many regions around the world. In 2015 - 2016 alone, the Gorkha (Nepal), Meinog (Taiwan), Kumamoto (Japan), Muisne (Ecuador), Amatrice (Italy) and other earthquakes resulted in serious regional damage. Earthquake science is essential for revealing the nature of earthquake generation and for extracting lessons from these events to help society reduce the impacts of future events.

Geodesists and seismologists have been cooperating to unveil the secrets of earthquakes. Recent development and deployment of observation/measurement technologies such as space geodetic techniques (real-time GNSS, InSAR, GRACE etc.), global and regional broadband seismic networks, and tsunami recording systems now enable us characterize the full earthquake cycle and to image the rupture process of earthquakes with much higher resolution in space and time than before.

This session welcomes reports on all studies of recent devastating earthquakes with geodetic/seismological/tsunami techniques, including investigations of source process, slip distribution, damage, pre/co/post-seismic deformation, geological/geophysical structure around the source faults, tectonic implications, and other associated phenomena.

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J03 Deformation of the lithosphere: Integrating seismology and geodesy through modelling (co-sponsored by the International Lithosphere Program (ILP))

Convener: (Park University, USA)
Co-convener: Rob Govers (Utrecht University, The Netherlands), Takuya Nishimura (Disaster Prevention Research Institute, Kyoto University, Japan)

Description

The past decade has witnessed significant advances in our capabilities to observe lithospheric deformation on a range of spatial and temporal scales. Improved tools for imaging earthquake rupture processes, and the combination of densified, continuous GPS (cGPS) networks with space-based and airborne direct observations of crustal deformation such as InSAR and LiDAR have led to substantial improvements in our understanding of lithospheric deformational processes. In this symposium we invite submissions reporting research involving the acquisition and analyses of seismologic and geodetic data, and the utilization of those data through modeling to map and quantify rates and patterns of lithospheric deformation. Of particular interest are (1) studies that integrate data sets and data types, (2) modeling of processes that span temporal ranges including the earthquake cycle and subsequent rupture, and (3) longer term processes that permanently deform the lithosphere.

This symposium is co-sponsored by the International Lithosphere Program.

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J04 Geohazard early warning systems

Convener: (Meteorological Research Institute, JMA, Japan)
Co-convener: Yusaku Ohta (Tohoku University, Japan), Hiroaki Tsushima (Meteorological Research Institute, JMA, Japan), Yih-Min Wu (National Taiwan University, Taiwan), Yuhe Tony Song (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, USA)

Description

For earthquake and tsunami early warnings, real-time monitoring and analyzing earthquake ground motions with seismometers and GNSS, and on- and offshore tsunami observation have been extensively developed in last several years. These new developments provide powerful tools for earthquake and tsunami disaster preparedness and mitigations. Recently, great efforts have been made around the world to mitigate earthquake and tsunami disasters in a wide range, including observatory development, real-time monitoring, progress of theory, investigation of source mechanism, real-time forecasting, rapid damage assessment, and so on.

Geohazard early warning systems, such as earthquake and tsunami early warning systems, exist today in many locations around the world. This session is organized to bring together scientists and engineers from a broad range of backgrounds, such as seismology, geodesy, tsunami research and earthquake engineering, to promote collaborative communications at the leading edge of science and technology for mitigating earthquakes, tsunami and related hazards. In this session, we will discuss new ideas, methods and applications of (near) real-time data analysis of seismic, geodetic (GNSS) and tsunami data, as well as real-time predictions for disaster preparedness and mitigations. Although the main contents of the session are earthquake early warning, real-time GNSS analysis, and real-time tsunami forecast warning, other related topics are also encouraged.

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J05 Crustal dynamics: Multidisciplinary approach to seismogenesis

Convener: (Nagoya University, Japan)
Co-convener: Hiroyuki Noda (Kyoto University, Japan), Kuo-Fong Ma (National Central University, Taiwan)

Description

Recent deployment of dense seismic and geodetic observation networks has revealed detailed pattern of crustal stress and strain rate in tectonically active regions all over the world. Furthermore, the Mw 9.0 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake in northeast Japan provided a unique opportunity to investigate how the Japanese Islands' crust responds to instantaneous as well as transient stress changes due to the giant fault motion. So now is a time to proceed toward integrated understanding of dynamic processes in the Earth's crust, such as great earthquakes and following relaxation. In those approaches, mechanical properties of the crustal and mantle rocks, and frictional properties of intra-plate as well as plate boundary faults, are important key factors. This session aims to bring various research results together to promote multidisciplinary investigation in the above-mentioned direction for better understanding of crustal dynamic processes. We welcome presentations regarding seismic, geodetic, and other geophysical observations and data analysis, laboratory experiments, geological field works, numerical simulations, and integrated modeling of seismogenic as well as other geodynamic processes.

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J06 The spectrum of fault-zone deformation processes (from slow slip to earthquake)

Convener: (Kobe University, Japan)
Co-convener: Yoshihiro Ito (Kyoto University, Japan), Chris Marone (Pennsylvania State University, USA)

Description

The aim of this session is to bring together the latest, cutting-edge work on the spectrum of fault-zone deformation processes and slip behaviors. We welcome contributions on slow deformation and fast fault slip that will improve our understanding of fault creep, slow slip events, tectonic tremor, episodic tremor and slip, very low-frequency earthquakes, and ordinary earthquakes. The session will highlight linkages between slow and fast fault slip (earthquakes) and explore scaling relationships for the observed spectrum of fault slip behaviors. Contributions from all areas are welcome, including geophysical and geodetic observations, studies of fault zone structure, laboratory experiments, geological surveys, theoretical works, and numerical studies.

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J07 Tracking the sea floor in motion

Convener: (Tohoku University, Japan)
Co-convener: Narumi Takahashi (National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience, Japan), Tadashi Ishikawa (Japan Coast Guard, Japan), David Chadwell (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, USA)

Description

Observations of seafloor deformation uncover various important tectonic processes difficult to resolve by conventional onshore monitoring. Remarkable technological progress achieved in the last decade has allowed monitoring motions of the sea floor with broad frequency range. A number of new discoveries are being made to characterize behavior of submarine faults, particular in subduction zones as well as migration of materials related to submarine volcanic activities. We invite submissions on studies based on various different techniques; e.g. GPS/A, pressure recording, direct-path acoustic ranging, broadband seismometries, and measurements of gravity, tilt and strain. Papers on measurement systems, data processing methods, observational results, and modeling studies using seafloor observations are all welcome.

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J08 Imaging and interpreting lithospheric structures using seismic and geodetic approaches

Convener: (Earthquake Research Institute, the University of Tokyo, Japan)
Co-convener: Shuichi Kodaira (JAMSTEC, Japan), Ryo Honda (Tono Research Institute of Earthquake Science, Japan), Tim Stern(Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand)

Description

This session covers the imaging and interpretation of crustal and upper mantle structures using seismological and/or geodetic approaches in a variety of tectonic settings for the purpose of understanding the geodynamical processes occurring in the lithosphere. Settings may include oceanic ridges, active/passive continental margins, continental collision zones, rift and basins, oceanic/continental lithospheres, etc. We welcome papers on crustal/lithospheric structures and their heterogeneities, on any scale, as obtained from a variety of geophysical measurements including seismic, geodetic, and potential data surveys. We also encourage presentation of technical papers focusing on methodological aspects of imaging and their applications to real data.

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J09 Geodesy and seismology general contributions

Convener: (Earthquake Research Institute, the University of Tokyo, Japan)
Co-convener: Aitaro Kato (Earthquake Research Institute, the University of Tokyo, Japan), Yoshiyuki Tanaka (Earthquake Research Institute, the University of Tokyo, Japan), Takuto Maeda (Earthquake Research Institute, the University of Tokyo, Japan)

Description

This symposium is for general contributions in seismology and geodesy, which does not belong to any other symposia.

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